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Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts hold candlelight vigil to honor victims of deadly train derailment

Dozens of Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts brought the community together in DuPont on Wednesday night to honor the victims of Monday’s deadly Amtrak train derailment. (KOMO News) 

DUPONT, Wash. -- Dozens of Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts brought the community together in DuPont on Wednesday night to honor the victims of Monday’s deadly Amtrak train derailment.

The last visible elements of the crash have been hauled away and traffic is getting back to normal now that all of the southbound lanes of Interstate 5 past the crash site have been reopened.

Troop 472 wants everyone affected by the crash to know the community is behind them.

"We come to pray and reflect on something that looks so bleak. And it was. Something that looks so dark and it was. Something that was very painful and it was," a chaplain said as Wednesday's vigil began. "Tonight we ask for comfort for those families that lost loved ones."

The prayers and the moment of silence observed outside DuPont Police headquarters helped mark the beginning of a difficult healing process after the unthinkable tragedy just down the interstate.

Dozens of Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts and their families held candles to honor the victims of the crash.

They offer support and love.

"I think everyone has just been feeling really sad that this happened," said parent Lisa Parker.

"Tonight we remember that these people were thrust into our town, we embraced them. And we remember their loss. We mourn their loss," said Mike Courts, Mayor of DuPont. "We pray for the recovery of those that have been injured and we thank our Lord that we had the opportunity to be the ones here to serve them."

The Scouts organized the vigil in response to so many calls and emails to do something that would resonate with the community.

Their gesture Wednesday night may have been simple.

But it’s a powerful symbol of how strong this city is.

"I was thinking that I wish the train accident never happened," said 8-year-old Aiden. "I feel really sorry for the people that were on the train."

"I think they would be grateful that we came here," added 9-year-old Samuel. "We came here to honor them."

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